Tuesday, May 1, 2012

Anecdotal Near Death Experiences.



"Seeing is believing."



 From time to time I have customers in my cab who've reported near death experiences. It happened again last night. The man told me that 20 years ago he was hit by a car, and "pronounced dead". This "death" lasted nearly 30 minutes, he said, and he "woke up in the morgue" (which I suppose could have been a hospital morgue where corpses are frozen). It's not the first time I've heard accounts like this (and it won't be the last). One of the more intriguing accounts was several years ago from a World War II veteran who fought in Papua New Guinea. The account I heard last night was very similar, so my mind went back to the veteran.


Curious as usual last night, I asked, "did you see anything when you were dead".


"Yes, I did. I saw a light, and I was drawn towards it".


"Did you see God?"


"No, but there was a light"


"Was it a good or bad experience?"


"Very good. I was very happy. I wanted to stay there and not come back to endure all the pain and suffering here."


"And what happened after that?"


"God, or the light, told me that it was not my time, and that I had to go back because I had not finished what I was sent to earth to do. I was not a believer before that, but I am now."


The veteran I spoke to several years ago also seemed hazy about distinguishing "the light" and God. He was adamant that he'd not "seen God", yet in the same breath would turn around and describe God and "the light" as the same thing. His certitude of life after death was as firm as the man I spoke to last night. Not a shadow of doubt in either of them.


I've read far more about NDEs, and NDE accounts, than I've heard firsthand, but the firsthand accounts always make me wonder more. Reading and hearing firsthand are not quite the same thing. The latter has a greater "thought-provoking" impact, and this is what motivated Dr. Raymond Moody to write his book Life After Life

This isn't a subject that occupies my mind 24/7, but it never fails to make me think a lot more about the possibilities when I do hear such experiences firsthand.

4 comments:

  1. Hi Ray
    I've heard similar stories from the passengers in my London taxi. They too have discribed a bright light.

    I hope they are right. Just imagine going through all this pain and suffering, only to be met by absolutely nothing at the end.

    The thought of one day being reunited with my beloved wife again is really the only thing that keeps me going

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  2. Thanks, Thomas.

    I guess we're exposed a lot more to feedback from the public than the average person, so not everyone gets to hear this sort of thing, if ever. It's more like "something you read about in distant places". I'm always sort of "re-awakened" when I hear them from time to time, and go away thinking, "Hmmmm...".

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  3. Oddly, I happened into your blog in connection to the Author Daryl Reanney, his books constituting a piece of the fabric I admittedly weave for both intellectual curiosity and because thinking about the marco aspects of the world helps me to deal with the micro. though not an expert in NDE's, I have had a couple ( and yes one chemically induced)peaks behind the curtain and have chased them in the sober realm, sometimes nudging at the curtain......but mostly my jumping monkey brain keeps me a bit asleep. But there is something beyond hard science, the most transcendent moments of your life tell you that the whole is greater than the sum of the parts, that as Plato contended...there is truth and beauty.....your blog suggests you already know this, be well

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    Replies
    1. Anonymous wrote: "But there is something beyond hard science, the most transcendent moments of your life tell you that the whole is greater than the sum of the parts, that as Plato contended...there is truth and beauty.....your blog suggests you already know this, be well."

      You certainly read me right. For a start: The Laws of Physics Vary Throughout the Universe, New Study Suggests.

      That suggests to me that dogmatic "certainties" are parochial. We won't know what's really possible, until we venture outside of our "earthly blinders" and realise that God does, indeed, "play dice".

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